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Tuesday, 10 October 2017

ETRUSCAN FINGER ARROW RELEASE



ETRUSCAN FINGER ARROW RELEASE

Finger arrow release or a tool for stretching a bow - bronze.
Etruscan or Hellenistic / Roman period.





































© Yiorgos Nikiteas 

All rights reserved. No part of the text and photographs within the text may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by electronic means or otherwise, without the prior permission of the publisher.





Friday, 29 September 2017

ASSYRIA - FROM NINEVEH, NORTH and SOUTH PALACE / BRITISH MUSEUM


ASSYRIA
FROM NINEVEH, NORTH and SOUTH PALACE / BRITISH MUSEUM



The Royal Lion Hunt. 645-635 BCE




The Royal Lion Hunt. 645-635 BCE
No thumb ring release!



The Royal Lion Hunt.645-635 BCE




The Royal Lion Hunt.645-635 BCE



The Royal Lion Hunt.645-635 BCE



The Royal Lion Hunt.645-635 BCE



The Royal Lion Hunt.645-635 BCE



The Royal Lion Hunt.645-635 BCE



The assault on Lachish 700-692 BCE




The assault on Lachish 700-692 BCE


The assault on Lachish 700-692 BCE



The Royal Lion Hunt. 645-635 BCE



The assault on Lachish 700-692 BCE



Formal scenes. 865-860 BCE
Arrows with parabolic feathers.



The assault on Lachish. 700-692 BCE



The assault on Lachish. 700-692 BCE



The Royal Lion Hunt. 645-635 BCE



The Royal Lion Hunt. 645-635 BCE



The Royal Lion Hunt. 645-635 BCE



The assault on Lachish. 700-692 BCE



The assault on Lachish. 700-692 BCE



The assault on Lachish. 700-692 BCE



The assault on Lachish. 700-692 BCE






© Yiorgos Nikiteas 

All rights reserved. No part of the text and photographs within the text may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by electronic means or otherwise, without the prior permission of the publisher.



Thursday, 28 September 2017

THE ROYAL ARMOURIES MUSEUM / LEEDS UK



THE ROYAL ARMOURIES MUSEUM / LEEDS UK



A short visit to the museum by GREX LUPORUM members on the way back to the south of England from Jorvik 2017 festival. Here are some images of a personal interest and we are hoping that some of the information will be useful to other friends.




















Long bow stave from the Mary Rose, made approximately 1544 (the boat sank in 1545). You can see where the horn nock sat over the wood and what also appears to be the 'bastard' or 'false' nock for using with a stringer.  https://royalarmouries.org/leeds/






 Broadheads, European, 15th CE
Broadheads were used in peacetime for hunting large game because of their ability to cause large, disabling wounds. In war they were used against horses and unarmoured men. (Museum description ). https://royalarmouries.org/leeds/



 Bodkin heads, European, 15th CE
The long, armour-piercing bodkin head was the typical military arroehead of the Hundred Years War. They had originally been developed to pierce mail, but later proved more effective than other types against plate armours. (Museum description). https://royalarmouries.org/leeds/



 Types of Bodkin heads, European, 15th CE. https://royalarmouries.org/leeds/



Arrow storm - Art installation









Bascinet (hound skull style) Helmet with mail aventail. Eye loops protrude outwards to help deflect attacks to the eyes. Pointed nose to also to deflect blows. They come together for quite a menacing look!  https://royalarmouries.org/leeds/



Showing the detail of how the aventail is attached to the helmet. The thread (probably linen) is used to sew the mail to the leather band which is then held in place over the brass loops on the helmet with more thread. The mail links are about 6mm and round rings (all riveted). This method of attachment could be used with an aventail made with flat rings but the flat rings possibly could slowly cut in and fatigue the thread.  https://royalarmouries.org/leeds/



 Showing the detail of how the aventail is attached to the helmet. The thread (probably linen) is used to sew the mail to the leather band which is then held in place over the brass loops on the helmet with more thread. The mail links are about 6mm and round rings (all riveted). This method of attachment could be used with an aventail made with flat rings but the flat rings possibly could slowly cut in and fatigue the thread.  https://royalarmouries.org/leeds/




 Mail shirt or haubergeon - probably German, mid -14th CE.
This short mail shirt is made of rows of riveted and welded rings. Such a flexible defence provided valuable protection against slashing blows. This haubergeon possibly belonged to Rudolf iV, Duke of Austria ,1339-65. (Museum description).  https://royalarmouries.org/leeds/




Mail cape on aventail, possibly German, mid-14th CE.
This mail defence protected the throat, neck and shoulders. Made of riveted iron rings and a decorative border of brass rings, the aventail was worn suspended from a helmet. A decorative textile covering, a vrysoon, could also be worn over the aventail. The helmet is a modern reconstruction. (Museum description).  https://royalarmouries.org/leeds/


 Three different sizes of rivered rings on a mail coat. Neck, shoulders, low arms.  https://royalarmouries.org/leeds/



 Three different sizes of rivered rings on a mail coat. Neck, shoulders, low arms.  https://royalarmouries.org/leeds/







 Different sizes of riveted rings on a mail.  https://royalarmouries.org/leeds/



 The inside of a steel plated armour of a brigandine.  https://royalarmouries.org/leeds/



Curious type of a helmet. There seemed to be a ridge on the helmet over where the ears would be. https://royalarmouries.org/leeds/



 'Bastard or hand-and-half sword - European, late 14th - early 15th CE.
Swords with longer grips that could be wielded with one hand or two were known as 'bastard swords'. They could be used as cut and thrust weapons and posed a threat to mail and plate armour. Similar swords appear on many English brasses and effigies of knights between about 1370 - 1425. (Museum description).  https://royalarmouries.org/leeds/




 Arming sword - Italian, probably Milanese, between about 1370 - 1430.
The forward cross-guard of this sword has a small hook-like branch for the forefinger to give extra control and protection. One of a group of about 75 swords, it may have been part of a tribute payment or war booty from Cyprus to Egypt. The sword bears an Arabic inscription which dates it about 1432 (836 in the Islamic calendar). (Museum description).  https://royalarmouries.org/leeds/



Ballock daggers - Probably English, late 14th - early 15th CE





 Pollaxe - North European, probably English, 1450 - 1500.
The poleaxe is a two-handed infantry weapon. Its head includes an axe-blade, hammer-head, and top-spike, designed to hack, crush and pierce plate armour as well as flesh and bone. The name derives from the old English 'poll', meaning head and has nothing to do with its wooden haft. (Museum description)

The shaft was approximately 6' long in this example but some medieval pole arms have been put on a different shaft at some point in their life.  
https://royalarmouries.org/leeds/









 Crossbow fire bolts production, Image 1 of 3. https://royalarmouries.org/leeds/


Crossbow fire bolts production, Image 2 of 3. https://royalarmouries.org/leeds/



 Crossbow fire bolts use at war, Image 3 of 3

Of the 3 men shooting near the bottom of the picture, 2 have cross bows but 1 looks like he is shooting the bolt from a barrel of an early gun. Some early fire arm projectiles were more bolts/arrows/darts rather than a ball of stone or metal.  https://royalarmouries.org/leeds/



A crossbow maker putting the final touches to a crossbow. Engraving from Olaus Magnus. A description of northern peoples, 1555 (Museum description)
Note: Attention to different types of bolt heads.


© Yiorgos Nikiteas 

All rights reserved. No part of the text and photographs within the text may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by electronic means or otherwise, without the prior permission of the publisher.